The Science of Learning School’s Partnership Initiative brings together Melbourne University researchers with teachers and school leaders to improve educational outcomes in schools.

As part of our series on learning science research, and how it applies to the classroom, we will be taking a deep dive into a handful of recent learning science research papers. While looking into some current research, we will pull out practical recommendations that can be implemented into the classroom.

This blog will focuses on a 2018 paper from two researchers at Goethe University in Frankfurt, Germany: Charlotte Dignath and Gerhard Büttner. Their paper looked at how teachers promote self-regulated learning (SRL) in both primary and secondary mathematics classes.

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Not all questions are created equal.

In this blog post, we’ll explore ways to think about and generate higher-order questions, with the use of the SOLO taxonomy.

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In this blog post, we’ll take it one step further and start to think about some practical ways to grow your students’ ability to self-regulate and develop metacognitive skills and knowledge. The evidence is clear that metacognition and self-regulated learning can accelerate student learning, but what does this look like in the classroom?

 

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In our last blog, we covered the basics of metacognition – what it is, the types of knowledge involved, and the evidence.

In this article, we’ll zoom out a little to cover the broader topic of self-regulated learning. Of course, metacognition is a major part of self-regulation puzzle. But, as we’ll see, self-regulation is a little broader.

 

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We are excited to present you with the first in our series of blogs on learning sciences research, designed to help you start thinking about research evidence and how it could look in your classroom. 

Our first blog introduces metacognition – there is a large and growing body of evidence to suggest that metacognition has a medium to large positive impact on student learning.

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Keynote 3: The 3H Strategy Toolkit

This term we are trying something a little different, and instead of providing an hour-long online keynote where a researcher describes their work to you, we have asked Professor Lorraine Graham from MGSE and Lynn Alder from the University of New England to create an online resource that lets you apply their work on the 3H Strategy in your classrooms.  This is a mnemonic strategy that helps students answer comprehension questions.  It is suitable for middle school students and the toolkit helps you understand this strategy and implement it in your classroom.  The toolkit includes sample passages and questions, a lesson plan, prompt cards and other resources.  It can be accessed at:  https://solcnetwork.com/the-3h-strategy/

Online Evening Forum on the 30th of May

Please follow the link to access the Google Form:  Planning a pilot program in using Student Voice

Keynote 1: Student Voice and Student Agency

In this presentation Sophie Murphy defines student voice and student agency and discusses how a strong sense of agency can support student learning. Sophie provides practical strategies that you can use to enhance student voice and student agency in the classroom.

Click HERE to view the presentation and access the resources

Access resources from past events and view future dates in the network schedule

Science of Learning Blogs and Vlogs
  •  Showcasing innovative education research and interventions from around the world
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The feedback that parents and teachers give to children can become internalised as self-talk.

Watch the first of our video blogs, which features Luke Mandouit’s insightful interview with Aisling Mulvihill, an expert on attention, self-talk, and self-regulation.

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Teachers are constantly giving their students feedback.  The problem is that students often don’t receive it.  So how can we improve both the feedback that we give and the capacity of our learners to receive and act upon feedback?    

In this interview, Luke Mandouit from the University of Melbourne discussed effective classroom feedback practices with Dr Cam Brooks from the University of Queensland.

An Educational Intervention Turning Young People into Published Authors in One Week

Writing a novel is hard for anyone, but for children or teenagers to work together to write, edit, and publish one in five days seems impossible.  Yet one research team in the UK is allowing them to do just that through an innovative program called ‘White Water Writers.’  The program has been run with children, teenagers, and young adults in schools, universities, foster homes, and prison.  Their voices and personal experiences are crafted into their stories and the novels are published and available for purchase online. The success of authorship provides young people with new skills, friendships, and motivation for future accomplishments.

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