SoLC Network

There is a strong link in the research between self-regulation and student academic achievement in schools. Self-regulation extends beyond the walls of a classroom and provides students with the strategies to be life-long learners.

This translation focus will help teachers move their thinking toward authentic and rich learning experiences using cognitive engagement of students through self-regulated learning strategies.

To help you start we have provided you with the presentation from the Launch and a range of starter references, including videos and research articles.

Launch Presentation

Self_regulated_learning

 

Starter References

  1. High performing students regulate their own learning
  2. A Review of Self-regulated Learning: Six Models and Four Directions for Research
  3. Learners for life – OECD
  4. Pen principle 8: Embrace errors to improve learning
  5. Youtube: Self-regulation skills: Why they are fundamental.
  6. Encourage SRL in the classroom: A review of the literature
  7. Metacognition in the classroom
  8. The Self-Regulation Module by the University of Connecticut

Questioning sessions make up a significant portion of instructional time.  When questions are used effectively they can promote discussion, topic exploration and comprehension. 

If you choose to participate in this project then you will work collaboratively with other teachers to improve your teacher talk and your use of deep level questioning in your classrooms and to assess the effectiveness of your interventions.

To help you start we have provided you with the presentation from the Launch and a range of starter references.

Launch Presentation

Teacher Talk_SLRC

 

Starter References

1. Best Practice Strategies for Effective Use of Questions as a Teaching Tool

2. Classroom Questioning

3.  Why Talk Is Important in Classrooms

Establishing effective two-way feedback between teachers and students is one of the most powerful tools in education.

Two way feedback requires teachers to

  1. Determine what the student knows
  2. Provide students with specific instructions about how to advance from where they are to where they need to be, in small, manageable steps.
  3. Assess the impact of your instructions

If you choose to participate in this project then you will work collaboratively with other teachers to improve the quality of feedback in your classrooms and assess the effectiveness of your interventions.

To help you we have provided you with the presentations from the Program Launch and the first evening forum as well as several starter references.

Program Presentations

Launch Presentation

Forum 1 Presentation

Starter References

  1.  Analysis of New Zealand primary and secondary student peer-and self-assessment comments: Applying Hattie and Timperley’s feedback model
  2. The Power of Feedback
  3. A scholarly approach to solving the feedback dilemma in practice